Job Search News & Notes

Job Search News & Notes

US Wage Growth Slows Slightly, Up 2.1% Year Over Year In May With Pay Rising Faster For Recruiters, Retail And Health Jobs, Glassdoor Local Pay Reports Reveal
Wage growth falls to nearly flat in Houston (0.4%) and Philadelphia (0.5%); San Francisco only metro to see pay growth accelerate (2.3%) compared to last month
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/us-wage-growth-slows-slightly-up-21-year-over-year-in-may-with-pay-rising-faster-for-recruiters-retail-and-health-jobs-glassdoor-local-pay-reports-reveal-300465947.html
Nurse.org Report Reveals How Much Nurses Are Really Making in Every State
California and Nevada Top the List of Highest Salaries for Nurses Adjusted for Cost of Living.
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nurseorg-report-reveals-how-much-nurses-are-really-making-in-every-state-300466146.html
IBM Launches Cybersecurity Skills Initiative for “New Collar” Jobs
Announces New Programs & Recommendations to Expand Cybersecurity Workforce Pipeline
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ibm-launches-cybersecurity-skills-initiative-for-new-collar-jobs-300464854.html
Change at Work Linked to Employee Stress, Distrust and Intent to Quit, New Survey Finds
Almost one-third of U.S. workers cynical about organizational changes, management’s motives
At a time of change and uncertainty across the country, American adults who have been affected by change at work are more likely to report chronic work stress, less likely to trust their employer and more likely to say they plan to leave the organization within the next year compared with those who haven’t been affected by organizational change, according to a survey released by the American Psychological Association.
Half of American workers (50 percent) say they have been affected by organizational changes in the last year, are currently being affected by organizational changes or expect to be affected by organizational changes in the next year, according to APA’s 2017 Work and Well-Being Survey. The survey was conducted online in March by Harris Poll among more than 1,500 U.S. adults who were employed full time, part time or self-employed. Workers experiencing recent or current change were more than twice as likely to report chronic work stress compared with employees who reported no recent, current or anticipated change (55 percent vs. 22 percent), and more than four times as likely to report experiencing physical health symptoms at work (34 percent vs. 8 percent).